by Kristyn Kusek Lewis 

Is your bedroom sabotaging your Zzzs? Fix the top 5 culpritsby Kristyn Kusek Lewisby Kristyn Kusek LewisEvery time my husband and I board a plane, the same thing happens: We find our seats, settle in with our books and magazines, and before anyone has a chance to offer us a cold beverage, he's fast asleep. Meanwhile, I can only glare at him–wide-awake with envy. I can't sleep on planes. Or trains. Or in any room not equipped with a not too-soft, not too-firm mattress and kept at the perfect temperature. And if I don't clock in my required Zzzs, I am not a very happy camper.

Every time my husband and I board a plane, the same thing happens: We find our seats, settle in with our books and magazines, and before anyone has a chance to offer us a cold beverage, he's fast asleep. Meanwhile, I can only glare at him–wide-awake with envy. I can't sleep on planes. Or trains. Or in any room not equipped with a not too-soft, not too-firm mattress and kept at the perfect temperature. And if I don't clock in my required Zzzs, I am not a very happy camper.I don't hold out much hope I'll ever be able to conk out on an airplane, but experts say that a few simple changes in my bedroom could help me sleep a lot better. And I'm feeling motivated–turns out that my fussy sleeper personality could make me sick.

Researchers from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine recently found that consistently not getting a good night's rest can have a serious impact on my immune system, making me more prone to colds, infections, and serious conditions such as diabetes. Here are some simple changes that can turn any bedroom into a den of sweet dreams. Try them in yours–tonight.

You keep a messy pile of papers on your nightstand…
…and your desk…and the floor.

A cluttered sleep environment makes for a cluttered mind–the kind that churns well into the night. Stress is the number one cause of short-term sleep problems such as frequent middle-of-the-night waking and insomnia, according to the American Psychological Association.

Fix IT.

Filed under Sleep Disorders, All About Sleep, Sleep Research and News, Sleep Remedies by SleepyBill.
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Nighttime teeth grinding (bruxism) is a fairly common habit in babies and young children. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders by SleepyNews.com.
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Sleep paralysis is a temporary state of complete inability to move or speak, occurring just before dropping off to sleep or just before fully awakening from sleep. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders, Dreams and Nightmares by SleepyNews.com.
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Night terrors are caused by intense brain activity during deep Stage 4 sleep.

In contrast, nightmares are a type of dream and occur during the REM sleep stage. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders, Dreams and Nightmares by SleepyNews.com.
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Teeth grinding can lead to migraines because of the powerful pressure exerted by the muscles in the head and jaw when teeth are clenched. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders by SleepyNews.com.
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While it's generally accepted that restless leg syndrome (RLS) has no cure, it's a disorder that can be controlled through various means. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders by SleepyNews.com.
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Sleep terrors are more common in younger children, and tend to disappear on their own by the time the child reaches adolescence. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders by SleepyNews.com.
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Bruxism (teeth grinding) often occurs at night, when people clench or grind their teeth while sleeping.

Usually they have no idea they're grinding their teeth while they're doing it, but awaken with symptoms including headaches, sore teeth, and a jaw that aches or even clicks. Read more

Filed under Sleep Disorders by SleepyNews.com.
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